London Bi Folding Doors

by Scott Edwards
Dec
14

The vast majority of bi folding doors are manufactured with fully glazed panels and a consistent door frame section. This is by far the most popular style that customers request, but many do not realise that in fact any style of door can be manufactured and fitted to a bi folding mechanism, and there are multiple options on how to configure them.

A good example of what is achievable with bi fold doors is when we were approached by the founder of London based children’s clothing chain Jojo Maman Bebe to manufacture a custom bi folding door system for her home. Our clients chosen design is technically referred to as “marginal lights” and is commonly seen in traditional sash windows and some French doors on Edwardian and Victorian buildings throughout the UK. The marginal style inserts small squares in each corner of the frame which are then connected with bars to create a margin, hence the term “Marginal lights”. The margins can then be glazed clear or with coloured glass to add more character which is exactly what our client opted to do. She further requested that the standard part timber, part aluminium cill be manufactured completely from timber. The aluminium exterior section is used because it has an inbuilt drainage system to keep the guidance track clear of water, whereas a timber cill must be manufactured to incorporate drainage that won’t cause rot. Early bi folding doors had their weight centred on the cill but this was problematic over time as a build up of debris would inhibit the smooth function, which is why almost all systems are now manufactured with the weight and operation in the head of the frame with the cill track solely for directional guidance.

Bookmarks:
Digg this Post    StumbleUpon this Post    Add this Post to Reddit    Add this Post to Facebook    Bookmark this Post on Delicious    Tweet this Post

RidgePro Construction

by Scott Edwards
Nov
26

Due to our proficiency in staircase manufacturing and our CNC capabilities we’re regularly approached by clients to come up with something a little different to facilitate the journey between floors. However, rarely are we requested to do this twice in one dwelling as was the case when Ridgepro construction director Peter Berry approached us regarding his ongoing contract in Chester.

This was a unique house with two separate first floor levels each accessing two bedrooms on opposing sides of the property. The first staircase would be situated in a large main hall as a design centrepiece and lead to the master suite and one other bedroom. Its primary feature was a floating effect that was created by a steel framework which would then have to be clad over in oak. Although the clients were advised that the cost could be significantly reduced and the steelwork completely eliminated by the introduction of a single newel post, they were insistent that the self supporting effect was of paramount importance, and so the manufacturing of components began. Each piece had to be made from a plywood template that was marked against the steelwork and then fitted into place. The process was made slightly more complex as there was also a stepped quarter landing and cut-string which would expose the steps on either side. Furthermore, the lack of a newel post at the outer corner meant that this junction had to be hand carved to match the sleek handrail design. Despite being highly labour intensive, the finished article was exactly as the 3D design the architect had generated.

Tags:

Bookmarks:
Digg this Post    StumbleUpon this Post    Add this Post to Reddit    Add this Post to Facebook    Bookmark this Post on Delicious    Tweet this Post

Grand Designs Live 2012

by Scott Edwards
Nov
15

The “Grand Designs Live” show was held at the NEC in Birmingham from Friday 12th – Sunday 14th October 2012. The show is based on the hit channel 4 series which is hosted by Kevin McCloud and features over 500 exhibitors from all areas of home improvement.

This was the first time we had marketed ourselves at an exhibition, so the apprehension grew somewhat as the show approached. Fortunately, having a showroom of our own afforded us some indication of the best way to utilise our 4m x 3m stand, in which we managed to accommodate 3 small staircases, 3 miniature pairs of hardwood gates, 1 high performance casement window, 1 sash windows and a 3 door bi-folding system. Obviously we could only fit a certain amount of product into the available space so to provide further examples of our work we installed a flat screen T.V with over 200 rolling images.

Tags:

Bookmarks:
Digg this Post    StumbleUpon this Post    Add this Post to Reddit    Add this Post to Facebook    Bookmark this Post on Delicious    Tweet this Post

Apprenticeships

by Scott Edwards
Feb
26

Employing an apprentice is a big decision for any company. It’s a much easier option to take on a new staff member who already possesses the relevant experience and qualifications. Unfortunately, if we all operate in this manner, you can guarantee there will be a dire lack of qualified personnel to undertake innumerable tasks that we take for granted.

The construction industry has felt the effects of this in recent years. Due to the lack of apprenticeships available during the 1990’s, there was a resulting void of skilled tradesmen to carry out the necessary jobs. The government in the UK did recognise the need for training, began encouraging apprenticeships and creating new schemes to accelerate a supply element that could meet demand. Obviously there was a positive effect, but the void was the size of a decade, and the damage had already been done. Additionally, the popularity and greater availability of higher education, enormous growth in technology, (specifically the arrival of the internet), and the opening of European borders, all contributed toward a massive change for the construction industry and British tradesmen as a whole. Higher education opened the possibility of professional careers to everyone. The technological boom created entire new industries, and the opening of European borders allowed non UK national tradesmen to fill the gap. Although UK tradesmen did enjoy a period of inflated premiums for their skills, the subsequent competition quickly drove prices down considerably.

Bookmarks:
Digg this Post    StumbleUpon this Post    Add this Post to Reddit    Add this Post to Facebook    Bookmark this Post on Delicious    Tweet this Post